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Drawing from Cirque Du Soliel “Totem” 2012

30 minute sketch (on a 4″ x 6″ index card I tucked into my husband’s lunch) after seeing the magical beauty of “Totem” December 2012

Drawing from Cirque Du Soliel “Totem” 2012

30 minute sketch (on a 4″ x 6″ index card I tucked into my husband’s lunch) after seeing the magical beauty of “Totem” December 2012

Drawing from Cirque Du Soliel “Totem” 2012

30 minute sketch (on a 4″ x 6″ index card I tucked into my husband’s lunch) after seeing the magical beauty of “Totem” December 2012

30 minute sketch after seeing the magical beauty of “Totem” December 2012

I’m an artist, calligrapher & writer, so I approach pens (and pen reviews) from these angles. I’m also a pen and pencil addict.

When erasable ink pens first came on the market I felt disoriented. Why would I want to erase ink? I use ink because it is permanent. But I’ve changed, and it is freeing to draw, doodle, and write in ink and know I can erase if I need to.

All in all, I like the Pilot Frixion color-Pencil-Like Erasable Gel Ink Pens. Especially for doodling. They erase well, and the eraser is on the end of the pen’s cap, which I like. The pen feels very good in my hand: I like the friction grooves etched into the body.

Color: the yellow is too pale to see, the green is a lovely  dark forest green.

Beware Disappearing Ink (Good for Undercover Ops!): I was drying a drawing next to paper I’d written on with the pens, and some of the air reached the paper… and the ink disappeared!

What I like:

  • Ink is smooth, applies easily
  • Very little skipping (only when drawing fast long lines)
  • Erases well, leaving only a slight ghost of the drawing/writing


What I’d like better:

  • If the ink were a little more saturated in color (especially the black)
  • If the ink didn’t skip at all when making longer lines quickly (this is a minor point: I was making long lines with a ruler, and there was too much slippage for that purpose)

Jewelry artists you won’t want to miss the opportunity to enter…

http://www.craftartedu.com/mydreamjewelrystudio4

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Lark is giving away a copy (US residents only) of their latest gorgeous bead book Showcase 500 Beaded Jewelry

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The following is an excerpt from my May 2012 Margie’s Muse column. Download and read it in full.

Fifty colors of complex patterns and harmonies rotate around “Genevieve’s Hat” by Anne Hawley. Your eye is drawn in and around, led by the colorful rhythms. An assemblage of sead and semi-precious beads, and Swarovski crystal in flat round peyote stitch on suede lining.

What makes a well designed piece of beadwork? How do you create a unified, harmonious piece so completely balanced and whole that nothing added or taken away would improve it? Pattern is one way.

Because they transmit visual rhythm, patterns can invigorate your jewelry design with movement. That movement can make a design hum, sing, or belt out loud.

Surface pattern is inherent in seed bead weaving. The locking together of the beads and the minute spaces between them sets up predictable geometric patterns.

Pattern is created by repetition. Like a tour guide, it invites you in, and shows you around.

In a well-planned pattern, the eye travels, following points of interest. These points may be the brightest (or darkest) colors, or the largest expanses of color. They may be directional shapes and elements, like lines or arrows. In fact, any element that stands out from its surroundings becomes a point of interest, or focal point….

Download and read it in full.